• Cecil and Olive Hughes at Southgate County school

    Cecil and Olive Hughes at Southgate County school

    Cecil and Olive Hughes at Southgate County school

    (check here for this pic)

    Okay, this was long before the times of 9DR, but... Mark has unearthed a real treasure: the long ago recordings of a few details of Monsieur Père's and Auntie Olive's youth as they were pupils at Southgate county School. There used to be a school Magazine, and this website has copies starting in 1910, and which ran until 1968 (it was then called "Spectrum):

    Cecil and Olive Hughes at Southgate County school

    This is an extract, in French and English, of the first issue:

    Cecil and Olive Hughes at Southgate County school

    I honestly wonder why they wanted to "mettre les impôts aux chats"...

    There were also a section called "Original contributions", and I can't refrain from the pleasure of reprinting this one:

    ORIGINAL CONTRIBUTIONS.

    We have much pleasure in reprinting from our first issue of the School Magazine of 1910 these two original contributions.[I quote only the first]

    TOOTHACHE!

    (With apologies to Shakespeare)

    To have it out, or not: that is the questions

    Whether 'tis nobler in the end to suffer

    The shoots and anguish of an aching molar.

    Or to take arms against this painful toothache.

    And by extraction end it? To pulls to shriek;

    No more, and by a pull to say we end

    The toothache and the thousand natural shocks

    The mouth is heir to, 'tis a consummation

    Devoutly to be wished. Or to have gas|

    To sleep: perchance to dream: ay there's the rub;

    For in that gaseous sleep what dreams may come

    When we have shuffled to unconsciousness,

    Must make us shudder: there's the respect

    That makes calamity of such extraction;

    For who would bear the shoots and starts of pain,

    This awful agony, the swift swelling face,

    When with a powerful wrench and with a pull

    That patient man can ease the hideous ache

    And with yet one more tug quietus give

    For half-a-crown? Who would toothache bear,

    To grunt and grumble with a fearful tooth,

    But that the dread of suffering at the dentist's,

    That grim and awful chamber from whose bourn

    No patient whole returns, weakens the will,

    And makes us rather bear those ills we have

    Than fly to others that we would not know?

    Thus toothache does make cowards of us all;

    And thus the nat'ral man of resolution

    Is sicklied o'er with the pale cast of fear,

    Determination made by valorous men

    With this regard their strong wills turn awry

    And teeth escape extraction.

    (A.F. Sheffield, 6.A.)

    Now, if one reads through, one can find allusions to Cecil and Olive:

    Cecil and Olive Hughes at Southgate County school

    Any idea what "drill colours" would have been? Mark thinks they were for sports, but I'm not sure.

    On Saturday, June 19th, 1915, there was an Athletic Sports day:

    Cecil and Olive Hughes at Southgate County school

    And here is part of a list of the winners for the long jump!

    Cecil and Olive Hughes at Southgate County school

    I see this victory as a prophecy of Auntie Olive's long jump over the long expanse of the XXth century! In 1917, Olive gets a mention for her garden cultivation:

    Cecil and Olive Hughes at Southgate County school

    Cecil and Olive Hughes at Southgate County school

    "All will be well"!! Those who doubt (are there any?) the impact of such programmes on Auntie Olive's formation can have a look at what she liked talking about so much here!

    Did Auntie Olive go to Cambridge?? Never heard of that! See below (lifted from the issue of 1920):

    Cecil and Olive Hughes at Southgate County school

    Cecil and Olive Hughes at Southgate County school

    Year 1921 has a mention of C. Hughes' success at his BSc Intermediate examination ("presumably this was Queen Mary College, Uni of London", says Mark who is better informed than I am):

    Cecil and Olive Hughes at Southgate County school

    In 1926, Cecil Hughes resigned his position (treasurer maybe - suggests Mark) in the Old Boys' club due to other duties, and we have a kind of indirect criticism of his departure in the lines that follow...

    Cecil and Olive Hughes at Southgate County school

    Cecil and Olive Hughes at Southgate County school

    There! that's all for now! Interesting isn't it? And if some of you have family or friends who have been at this school, the magazine is a mine of information.

    Cecil and Olive Hughes at Southgate County school

    Cecil and Olive Hughes at Southgate County school

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  • Comments

    1
    MarkP
    Tuesday 8th October 2013 at 22:17

    Well "drill colours" are obviously for drill, i.e. a body of people marching in formation around a parade ground. Usually you get colours for representing your school in sports.

    2
    Tuesday 8th October 2013 at 22:21

    Thanks, I was hesitating because ot the military undertones of "drills".

    3
    MarkP
    Tuesday 8th October 2013 at 23:25

    It must have been exactly that. The war wasn't "over by Christmas" after all and in 1915, the shout was "your country needs you". They certainly went through it, didn't they? Twice.

    4
    Helene Pavey
    Wednesday 9th October 2013 at 23:23

    like houses? St George, St Andrews, etc?

     

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    5
    Thursday 10th October 2013 at 23:57

    What do you mean, "like houses?"

    BTW, do any of you have an answer as to Auntie Olive's university years??

    6
    MarkP
    Monday 21st October 2013 at 15:35

    "Houses", like Campion at StIgs, you remember? But "house colours" are different, as in Gryffindor's house colours, for example, which are red and gold. But colours for sporting endeavour are an emblem (type varies) given to you to wear for representing your school in external competition.

    Olive pursued a teaching qualification at Homerton College, Cambridge. Don't think it was a BA, but she received a credit in Gardening. Cecil "took a second" (as they used to say) in an Electrical Engineering BSc. degree from East London (later Queen Mary) College, University of London. 

    7
    Monday 21st October 2013 at 21:23

    Thanks Mark for these unknown details; I can picture Auntie Olive at Cambridge only with the greatest difficulty. Anyhow we don't have any photo of her as a young woman, do we? (this one is the earliest I know) And what was a "second" in MP's case? It's not the same as when you say someone gets a first, is it?

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