• Here's the collection of PG wartime pics I have! Of course it would be fun for some of the aunties to tell us about about their memories of the war... Aunty Mary??

    Wartime

    Wartime

    Wartime in Palmers Green

    Wartime in Palmers Green

    Wartime in Palmers Green

    This last one is apparently a picture of Hazelwood Lane houses hit by a bomb. And below is a sign indicating the presence of the ARP Staff Shelter - Air Raid Protection, which (on top of the one at Broomfield House shown above) existed at the PG railway station, because this is a writing which apparently is still visible on the London-bound platform wall. I'll have to go there one day and see for myself!

    Wartime in Palmers Green

    These are the only pictures I'm sure about which concern PG, and I have found a few extra ones on the FB pages devoted to Enfield & PG, but I'm not sure they refer to the area:

    Wartime in Palmers Green

    Wartime in Palmers Green

    Here you'll find the text which I am copying below (thanks for letting me!), the memories of a certain Martin Beckett telling about Wartime in Hazelwood Lane Infants school, where Auntie Olive used to be headmistress:

    "We lived in Ulleswater Road, which was the first road in N14 Southgate, but was really much closer to Palmers Green N13. At age 5 and a few weeks I started at Hazlewood Lane Infants School in September 1944 and during my first term an incident occurred which I have never been able to identify for certain. One day during class our teacher suddenly told us to get under our desks as quickly as possible and take cover. As soon as we had done this there came the sound of a most enormous explosion not very far away. I'm sure it happened in that order, with the teacher's warning before the explosion and not the other way round.

    Now I can remember my parents telling me about a German V2 rocket which landed on the railway line near Palmers Green station. I don't actually remember that rocket but it definitely happened and I know the date and time of its landing. However I'm certain that rocket was not what led to the incident at school. Firstly the V2 at PG station is reported in the official records as landing at about 6.45 p.m. which was well after school hours. I know that time is about right because a fragment of the railway track came though the roof of the house where one of my classmates lived, and she remembers it was in the evening before bedtime. The second reason why it could not have been a V2 is because no-one could hear or see a rocket coming and it would have been impossible for our teacher to warn us. Even the Germans when they fired off the rockets didn't know exactly where they would land.

    One possible explanation which fits with my recollection of what happened is that the explosion during school hours was caused by a V1 flying bomb landing somewhere near Palmers Green. The V1s were known as ' buzz-bombs' because of the noise made by their jet motors, and when that noise stopped you knew the bomb was going to land close by within a few seconds. If what our teacher heard was the sound of a V1 engine cutting out then a warning to take cover could have been given. The problem is that, not for the want of trying, I have so far been unable to track down a date or time for V1s which landed in or near Palmers Green. There were several V1s within the Borough of Southgate which in 1944 also included Palmers Green. This information must exist somewhere. The date would probably have been fairly close to that of the known V2, which was 26 October 1944, otherwise it is unlikely that I would have remembered my parents telling me about that incident. If anyone reading this has the details, please post them here. Many thanks."  A memory shared by Martin Beckett , on Sep 20th, 2009.

     

    Wartime in Palmers Green

    Wartime in Palmers Green

    Wartime in Palmers Green

    Wartime in Palmers Green

    Below is a picture of Cath talking part in the "Victory dance" - Broomfield Park?

    Wartime in Palmers Green

    And these contemporary pictures are of the Broomfield Park decontamination centre:

    Wartime in Palmers Green

    Wartime in Palmers Green

    Wartime in Palmers Green

    Check here for some explanations.

    For those interested, lots of things about WW2 in the area to be found here: https://enfieldatwar.wordpress.com/


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  • Church

    A post (the one hundredth!) dedicated to St Monica's parish church. Above, an aerial view of where the church would be built!

    Here and there on the blog some pictures about Church practice have been posted (check this link, and that one): here you'll find them all assembled under one heading. Father Gallagher was Grandpa's priest when he started being active in the parish. We can see him in the picture below his portrait with people gathered to inaugurate St Monica's church in 1912.

    Church

    Church

    And here he is in front of his church that same year:

    Church

    Church

    My information tells me this is what the congregation looked like in 1914, just before WW1:

    Church

    A view of the same, but modern:

    Church

    This one is looking towards the exit:

    Church

    And here are some pictures of the outside:

    Church

    Church

    above was 1945

    here's a more recent one:

    Church

    Church

    Do you remember that our grandad used to be the church organist for a long time?

    Church

    Church

    And here is a view of the organ, revamped in 2014 (check here):

    Church

    We all know that some important family events took place in this church:

    Church

    Church

    Church

    Here you'll find a summary of the history of the church: LINK

    Did you know that before the church was built, there used to be a chapel, situated in Hazelwood Lane? I'm not sure its was RC though.

    Church

    Apparently it got sold (after the Church was built?) and became a shop:

    Church


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  • The Triangle through the years

    Above is a London bus blind which apparently can be bought on the net. As for the photos, I tried to post the pictures chronologically, but am not sure I have succeeded! I thought the presence  of a numbers of trees indicated a greater antiquity, and then only one was left.

    The Triangle through the yearsThe Triangle through the years

    The Triangle

    The Triangle

    The Triangle through the yearsThe Triangle through the years

    The TriangleThe Triangle

    The Triangle through the years

    The Triangle through the years

    The Triangle through the years

    The Triangle through the years

    The Triangle through the years

    The Triangle through the years

    The Triangle through the years

    The Triangle through the years

    The Triangle through the years

    The Triangle through the years

    Below a colourised version:

    The Triangle through the years

    The last tree grew, grew, until...

    The Triangle through the years

    The Triangle through the years

    ...one day it was gone

    The Triangle through the years

    The Triangle through the years

    The Triangle through the years

    Here you'll find that the Triangle used to be a meeting place for the suffragettes early in the century!! Here's an extract:

    The Recorder
    FOR PALMERS GREEN, WINCHMORE HILL AND SOUTHGATE.
    JUNE 18th 1914. One Penny 

    SUFFRAGETTES MOBBED AT PALMERS GREEN.

    "Mrs. Pankhurst's Brother takes Refuge in Magistrate's House.

    THERE were lively scenes at Palmers Green Triangle on Saturday night, when a party of local suffragettes was mobbed, and prevented from holding a meeting. Some of the London newspapers gave a rather exaggerated account of the affair, but the experience was a sufficiently unpleasant one for the suffragettes, and, but for the intervention of the police, would probably have been even more exciting. As it was, eggs and flour were thrown, Mr. Goulden, ex-secretary of the Winchmore Hill Ratepayers' Association, and a brother of Mrs. Pankhurst was knocked down, and one lady was roughly handled. Altogether, it was something rather more lively than the scenes to which staid and respectable Palmers Green is accustomed, something of the sort might have been expected, for on the previous Saturday, when the local members of the W.S.P.U. held a meeting the speakers were howled down, their voices being drowned by the singing of popular airs, including "Who killed Cock Robin?" and "God save the King".

    Moreover, threats were made that future meetings would be prevented. The interrupters were as good as their word.

    When the suffragette party, including Mr. Victor Prout and Mr. Goulden, arrived at the Triangle on Saturday last, they found a hostile reception awaiting them. The lady speaker who was to have conducted the meeting was late in arriving, and while the party were waiting, the crowd, which consisted largely of young men, began booing and indulging in horse play.

    Someone bought a copy of a suffragist publication from a lady on the outskirts of the crowd, tore it up and jumped upon it. This caused a disturbance, in the course of which Mr. Goulden's hat was knocked off. Seeing Mr. Goulden bareheaded, the crowd closed upon him with cries of "Mrs. Pankhurst's brother," and in the rush he was knocked down.

    Several policemen, both in uniform and in plain clothes, were present, and doubtless seeing that the crowd was bent on mischief, a police sergeant came to Mr. Goulden's rescue, and escorted him in the direction of Fox Lane, followed by a jeering mob."

    The Triangle through the years


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  • Over the past months, I have collected enough old photos of BP swings, slides, seesaws and witch hats for me to open this dedicated post. So here goes.

    Broomfield Park swings

    Broomfield Park swings

    Broomfield Park swings

    Broomfield Park swings

    Broomfield Park swings

    Broomfield Park swings

    Broomfield Park swings

    Broomfield Park swings

    Broomfield Park swings

    Broomfield Park swings

    Broomfield Park swings


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  • Nicknames

    Some families disregard them, others thrive on them - let's say ours is somewhere in between?  A number of our family members had, and still have a nickname. What do they correspond to? What do they mean? Where do they come from? I've tried to remember those I could, but I'm sure you can help! In fact, some nicknames are permanent while others were temporary or only known by a few relatives. So I've certainly left some out. And I didn't count diminutives (eg Chris for Christopher or Jan for Janet).

    The first person whose nickname I was told about is our real grandma Ethel who got herself called Pep because, (says AB, who wrote me this some time ago) "my mother was very lively, rather liked to shock – with a nickname of Pep, short for Pepper because of her temperament and the colour of her hair, a bright auburn, much like Noel’s and Tini’s. Always laughing and very unconventional. One of the 1920’s bright young things."

    Check this: she might have called herself Penelope!

    Nicknames

    Of course the next person with a nickname was our own Grandad, called “Monsieur Père” for us, and, I believe, only for us. I realized the other day this might have prevented us from calling him “sir”!! Mark says somewhere on the blog that this is what he had to call him; so this “monsieur qui est mon père”, which Helene shortened (as the story goes) acquired thus a familiar status that perhaps other grandchildren in the family didn’t know of. For me then, “Monsieur Père” certainly wasn't felt as formidable as he must have been for other cousins. And I think he rather liked to be called that - at any rate, he signed Monsieur Père on letters and cards sent to us to France (here).

    I'm not sure what to think of the name "Auntie Gamon" which certain people in the family gave our Grandma... We Millous never called her that, and I'm not quite sure it was really a nickname: it sounds like a real name, but I think it isn't. Those of you who know can tell me.

    Nicknames

    Only one of the four girls had/has a nickname, which is, er, kind of -fun, and what's fun is that there's a cute kitten out there with the same name:

    Nicknames

    I'll let dear AB tell us (if she wants!) about experiences she might have had with her nickname, but I think I remember that it originated from a time when she was a little girl, and used to play with bath toys. So yes, some nicknames can be a bit of a burden when you carry them with you on the path to adult life, as someone on my side knows very well!

    Us Millou cousins were all given nicknames, perhaps on account of my dad, who seemed attracted to them, but on the other hand at least three of them are English-sounding! The most inventive one belongs in fact to a pair of names: Tiny-weenie! This combo designated Hélène and Cath, and I believe it stuck because Charles liked it.

    Nicknames

    Difficult not to fall for them, right? What some of you may not know is that while Tiny (or Tini) became bigger but kept the name, Cath also kept "Weenie", only it was Frenchified as "Ouini"! And it has had a faithful career as designator of the said person for more than 45 years!! (and for those who wondered, my dad goes by the name of "Potin", which means "gossip" in French - go figure). So you might say that among the sisters AB isn't the only holder of a pet name! (but who knows, perhaps all of them have one yes)

    Nicknames

    Anyway, I'm next in line! Obviously Vivi comes from Yves and it started the somewhat maddening series of repeated syllables which affect even the best nicknames - makes one want to say:  I don't stammer you know. The obscure part of vivi comes from the adjunction of "boy", which I believe Grandma was so fond of, bless her soul. Does someone know why I had to be identified as a boy?!§%# Could it have some loose connection to "attaboy"? I know that Tinygirl was out, thanks to its association with weenie, but perhaps luckily my "boyhood" saved me from something as ghastly as "vivisection"!

    Nicknames

    (on the lookout for any other ill-inspired association?)

    Then there's "Paco": now here's a nice nickname!

    Nicknames

    With such a start in life, one certainly had great hopes! And a number 3 in all families, etc. But, alas, this fantastic renaming was doomed. It transmogrified itself into something totally impredictable: A "cacou", which I think is the French form of the Cuckoo:

    Nicknames

    Look what it did to him:

    Nicknames

    For the benefit of my readers, I have done some research on this strange animal, which my poor brother chose for his mascot:

    Nicknames

    Nicknames

    I apologize to the aforementioned readers about the strange language, but they must understand that one day or another their long ago language lessons would catch up with them.

    Nicknames

    Above is an artist's impression of what a cacou might look like in real life, sigh. Next to him on the right is a "cagole" believe it or not the feminine version of a "Cacou"!!  Finally here's a link which some might check about the period when cacous were invented.

    Back to the grindstone with Noël, who doesn't have a nickname, lucky him.

    LBNL, "babou". Well. Shame on us, because I think that we brothers and sister, a lot more than our uninspired parents, gave this name to him:

    Nicknames

    Okay so now it's up to you lot! To say the truth, I don't know many more names. Oh, there's Tweez, yes, and does it have something to do with someone's eyebrows?

    Nicknames


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